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girl may have been a target. and the treasures of scotland, the country's national museum will feature objects unseen for decades. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. taking it to the wire, that is what the u.s. congress is doing. next tuesday is the deadline for raising the country's debt ceiling or going into default. with five days to go the political shots are flying fast and furious. as the house of representatives gets ready to vote on a proposal the end game is far from clear, reason enough for the world's markets to worry. andrew north starts our coverage. >> fears of an american default are rippling worldwide. japan saw stocks plunge again. the u.s. congress, the battle goes on. some republican hard-liners are now backing their party's plan for a short-term increase in the debt limit, insisting americans are on their side. >> if he thinks he can do better, show us your plan mr. president. if the senate thinks they can do better, pass a bill. we are the only ones who passed a bill to resolve this debt crisis issue. we will pass a second one today. the
are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen who are the latest casualties in the phone hacking scandal. scotland yard is being accused of mishandling the investigation into "news of the world qug, maintaining at times close relationships with the very people they were supposed to be investigating. police officers accepting bribes from reporters has allegedly been commonplace. stephenson and yates deny any wrong doing on their part. >> i have acted with complete integrity and my conscience is clear. >> now the department tasked with counterterrorism and the 2012 olympics must find new leadership. what started as a scandal involving a single newspaper has now grown so large, it is rocking this country's institutions and the murdoch empire. so far, there has been four high profile resignations, ten arrests. most recently, rebecca brooks, one of rupert murdoch's most truste
. tonight, scotland yard's lead investigator says there may be as many as 4,000 victims in the case against rupert murdoch's media empire and among them, former prime minister gordon brown who says his family's privacy was violated by a story that hit very close to home. stephanie gosk has the report from london. >> reporter: the british public wants answers. rupert murdoch and top executive, rebecca brooks have all been asked to testify next week before a parliament committee. the powerful trio have yet to agree but "news international" the subsidiary that ran "the news of the world" is already defending itself against the latest allegations. in an interview on the bbc today, former prime minister, gordon brown, accused "news international" of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find this happened because of the links with criminals. >> reporter: in 2006, a murdoch paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son has cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information
the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policeman has officers investigating whether other officers were bribed by journalists. >> a small group of officers may have engaged in these practices. i will determine to do what we should do, and that is proceed to criminal courts. >> a former employee told the court last year as a witness that he knew nothing about payments from the police or to the police. e-mails have been provided the raise serious questions. >> someone from news international is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge, and that is very serious. >> tonight, it is reported that he will be arrested after setting himself to a police station for questioning. scotland yard says its investigation will be robust, whereas in the past, insiders say it has fallen short. on
broadcasting. a scandal that scotland yard now says may have targeted as many as 4,000 people. nbc's stephanie goss is in london for an update on moisture dough dock. >> the british public is looking for answers. the head of newscorp corporation rupert murdock, his son, james, and rebecca brooks have been asked to testify next week in front of a parliament. in an interview on the bbc, former prime minister gordon brown accused news international of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find that this happened. because of the links with criminals. >> in 2006, a murdock paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son had cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information. but a statement from news indianaer national says the story ran from a member of the public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. also on the defensive, investigators from scotland yard who face accusations that police accepted bribees from reporters. >> an organization of 50,000 people, we ha
" reporters used scotland yard police officials to ping people they were following or were interested in. that means they used actual cell phone towers to locate some of the celebrities or politicians that they wanted to follow. these are incredibly incriminating allegations that just go to show how wide the scope of this is, and how high up it goes within scotland yard and you mentioned today that the scotland yard investigators were in a hearing in parliament today facing tough questions from the members of parliament over their accusations that they turned a blind eye to what "news of the world" was doing and police officers were accepting payments of bits of information and on top of that you have prime minister gordon brown in an emotional interview with the bbc expressing his anger in the tactics of the newspapers owned by rupert murdoch were engaged in criminal activities and hired known criminals to get very personal information from him. >> and also, you have got -- this story is more incredible by the moment, but the former pop star and still is, stephanie, george michael went
. >>> this morning former editor of "news of the world" rebecca brooks is out of jail. meanwhile scotland yard's top cop resigned amid the phone hacking scandal in great britain. the head of the london police department, sir paul stevenson, resigned. he quit under intense pressure after it was revealed that scotland yard hired a former editor as a media consultant. that editor has also been arrested in connection with the scandal. >> i and the people who know me know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we'd have done some things differently, but i'll not lose any sleep over my personal integri integrity. >> british lawmakers are preparing to grill rupert and james murdoch. a parliamentary committee will question the duo about the scandal tomorrow. >>> today money will be flowing at the white house in the form of the nation's most prominent billionaires. president obama is hosting warren buffett and bill and melinda gates along with other members of the giving pledge. the giving pledge was founded by buffett and the gates family last year. it encourages america's wealthiest citizens to
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
for scotland yard. >> the murdochs are on the back foot. this is in the parlaiment and the power of the media. >> that is the latest from britain, where the pressure is mounting. the f.b.i. is probing allegations that newscorp tried to hack the phone records of victims of 9/11. concerns were raised by peter king, and joining him was democrat bruce brailey, who asked the house oversight committee to act. thank you for joining us. tyou say in your letter you have concerns about allegations that hacking extended to u.s. citizens. >> we do know there are concerns about the possibility that voicemails from 9/11 victims were obtained. there is a chance u.s. citizens may have had their emails accessed by newscorp. because of the alarm about this issue, i joined peter king and louise slaughter, from new york with a strong interest in protecting those victims. they are makin gsurg sure there is no violation of u.s. law, to provide the oversight the constitution requires. >> there was a possibility of victims of this. >> this is not a fishing expedition. the chair of the homeland security committee. th
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
minister say whether this inquiry does extend to scotland? does include the issues such as policing which has devolved in scotland and the scotland's first minister for that and in that context has he secured an assurance from an uncharacteristic required first minister about his contact with news international? >> i can confirm this inquiry does extend to scotland. as i said we did send the draft terms of reference to get the administrations. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with, which concerned the information commissioners' report which we haven't put specifically into the terms but, of course, it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it's such an important part of the work. more generally speaking, when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> lee scott. >> does my right honorable friend agree with that welfare allegations in the metropolitan police have a vast majority of hundreds of police officers are protecting us
the same issue at hand and the third is now the penetration into british politics, head of scotland yard resigning and david cameron 163 questions in one session and the most speculative, i think, what kirsten was saying, most american audience, can the obama justice department or somebody else find some way into damaging or subpoenaing the american part of this operation, which has no linkage i know of to anything happening in britain. >> that's pretty farfetched, number four. i can tell you i was impressed. the guardian actually did a story how it was, i won't say the word on tv, but cluster-- and interesting, also, talked about the fact that bbc and cnn were trying to make as much hay as they can, because they're afraid of the competition and they really wanted to slam down the competition. i thought that was very interesting. the new york times came up with something interesting, this is the best kind of story we don't know how it's going to end. that gets to the personal issue, this wouldn't be such a big story if it wasn't so much for a lot of the-- its larger than life characters.
scandal this morning. the head of scotland yard steps down and rupertmurdoch executive is arrested as murdoch himself apologizes. >>> 17 states face heat warnings and advisories. now it's headed east as millions of americans prepare for the summer scorcher expected to last for the next few days. >>> casey anthony may be out of jail but perhaps not out of trouble. we'll talk to one of her attorneys about what's next for the troubled accused killer and when she may resurface publicly early this monday morning, july when she may resurface publicly early this monday morning, july 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on monday morning, july 18th. i'm chris wragge. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. erica hill is off this morning. big bumer for the u.s. women's team. they were expected to win the world cup on sunday. a nail biter right to the end. it touched off huge celebrations in japan, where they're still recovering from the disasters, the earthquake, tsunami from early this spring. we'll have more on the tough loss for the u.s. women and wh
is a story for you. a retired couple from scotland are the winners of the mass of -- massive lottery. their prize, 185 million bureaus, the equivalent of $260 million. it puts them among the 500 richest people in britain. as for reactions, they were tickled pink. i think i would have put it more slightly stronger than that -- slightly more stronger than that, but you can read it along with the rest of the day's news at bbc.com/news. plus, check out our facebook page. for all of us at bbc world news america, thank you for watching and have a great weekend. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles. announcer: this program was made possible by: >> ♪ i'm a whirlibird... >> chuck e. cheese's, proud supporter of pbs kid
the recognition and gratitude of the nation. >> a retired couple from scotland has emerged as the winners of the record-breaking euro millions jackpot. they say it felt like a dream when they realized they had won. [applause] >> they say they are just a normal family, not flashy and not celebrity. a retired tv cameramen and foreigners are now one of which britain's wealth is couples. they were still rechecking the numbers when dawn broke. >> we could see the sun come out. it was just magical. we saw the kids were sleeping. it was absolutely -- we opened a bottle of wine. >> here come the results now. >> with morning came the confirmation that they had won the largest ever jackpot. the wind can uphold them to 140th london's richest. they would have preferred not to go public. but they did not think they could keep their massive winds secret and wanted to enjoy it. >> we are not scared of it. it will be so much fun. >> they are determined to do something good with the windfall. there's talk of foreign travel and may be a new car. >> i think we will not be immediately swapping cars. you have
. the crop was believed to be destined for the u.s. market. a retired couple from scotland has emerged as the winner of the record-breaking euro jackpot. it was at 185 million euros with the biggest ever. it felt like a dream when they found out they won. this contains some flash photography. >> they say that just a normal family, not flashy, not celebrities. collin and chris we're retired camera man and a nurse are the winners of the jackpot. they were rechecking the numbers when dawn broke. >> we could see the sun come out. it was just magical. but, you know, we sort of absolutely full of adrenaline, we opened a bottle of wine and i don't drink. >> and here comes though ree yo billion results no. >> with morning came confirmation of the win. the win catapults the we'res to 430 on the rich list. they would have preferred not to go public but didn't think they could keep their massive win secret and they wanted to enjoy it. >> we're not scared of it, you know, instead it's going to be fantastic and it's going to be so much fun. >> they're determined to do some good with their windfall.
uncomfortable questions about whether a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> a court in the hague has revealed a dutch state was responsible for the death of three muslim men. the town was under the protection of dutch u.n. peace keepers when it was overrun by seren force -- serb forces in july 1995. eight muslims were killed. they should have been protected by dutch troops. peter reports. >> july, 1995. a so called u.n. safe area. but one that was overrun by bosnian serb forces. the bosnian muslims thought they had the protection of dutch u.n. peace keepers. they were wrong. about 8,000 muslim men and boys were massacred by the bosnian serbs. today in a surprise legal ruling, a court in the netherlands decided that the dutch government bore some responsibility. the presiding judge said the appeals court believed the dutch state acted illegally towards three bosnian muslims and would have to pay compensation. it's been a long, painful legal ordeal for the relatives of the victims. >> i am after the killers of my family, the serbs, who live in bosnia. one of them even works in the same
about whether a blind eye was turned scotland yard.t >> the dutch military was partly responsible for the deaths of three muslim men during the war. the town was under the protection of u.n. peacekeepers when it was overrun in 1995 and 8000 muslims were killed. >> july, 1995, a so-called u.n. safe area but one that was overrun by bosnian serb forces. the bosnian muslims thought they had the protection of the dutch u.n. peacekeepers. they were wrong. 8000 muslim men and boys were massacred by the bosnian serbs. today in a surprise ruling, a court and the netherlands decided that the dutch government bore some responsibility. >> the presiding judge said the appeals court believed the dutch state had acted illegally towards three bosnian muslims and would have to pay compensation. it has been a long, painful legal ordeal for the relatives of the victims. >> im' after the killers of my family, the serbs, who lives in bosnia. one of them works in the same building i work. can you imagine that? i have to go to my office every day and he is still there. it is one of the cases i have been
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
. earlier, fionnuala sweeney spoke with rose gentle in scotland. her son was killed in iraq. >> i'm quite happy that that trsh newspaper is going to be shut down. will he open another paper up? >> reporter: what do you think should be done if these allegations are proven? >> if they're proven, they should go to court. everybody responsible should be put in front of a judge and if they're guilty, they should be sentenced. >> what would you like to say to those responsible? >> i would like to know why they felt they needed to hack my phone when it was concerning my son, i had lost a season. >> the outrage of the "news of the world" phone hacking is likely to be felt by other papers. >> the guardian first broke the news of the illegal hacking by "news of the world." richard quest spoke with michael white, assistant editor of "the guardian" newspaper. he sa >> i think rupert murdoch or james murdoch, his son, who runs the show in this country, has attempted to sacrifice the "news of the world" in order to safe the bskyb bed and to save rebecca brooks. why rebecca brooks? why shouldn't she be
is scheduled to testify next hour. >>> a second resignation from scotland yard, followed one from sunday. they said staying on would be a distraction. >>> during the last hour the commissioner admitted to making mistakes. >> the material is repugnant, with hind site we would have -- yes, i did. thirdly, do i accept the reasons why, i think that is for mr. clark to justify and i think it is a matter for the judicial review. >> today's testimony comes after the reporter who blew the whistle on the hacking was found dead yesterday but his death is not suspicious. he worked at the newspaper under andy carlson who later served as the prime minister's communications chief and arrested in the scandal we should know news corp. is the parent company of fox 5. back to you. >> wow. >> yeah, so a lot going on we will keep an eye on this and let you know when the next thing comes out but a lot going on keeps breaking. >> seems like every hour. >> yes. >> thanks wisdom. >>> now again rupert murdoch and his son's questioning about the phone hacking scandal is set to start in a half hour if it does happ
the paper's former chief was arrested and the head of scotland yard resigned. rupert murdoch, gets set to face parliament. marion rathje tee has more. >> reporter: rebecca brooks resigns her post as head of news corp.'s publishing empire in the uk and is arrested in connection with the phone tapping scandal. she was taken into custody on sunday and has since been released. she once edited the now defunct tabloid. >> murdoch has now lost his most loyal lieutenant. >> reporter: she is the 10th person arrested by police since she opened the investigation in january. all have been released without charges, the head of scotland yard also toppled sunday, stepping down and taking responsibility for his clothes ties to the newspaper. >> i've taken this decision as a consequence of the ongoing speculation and accusations related to the mat links at a senior level. >> reporter: reporters are accused of illegally tapping into phones of murder victims and others. it has derailed an attempt to buy a company -- >> the british public is engaged and i think w
hours and spoke with scotland yard and they say she is still in custody. 43-year-old brooks had top echelon of tabloid journalism here and ran the biggest newspaper group. she resigned on friday and two days later she has been arrested. she has not been charged yet, but again she has been arrested in connection with phone hacking and alleged bribes to police. she resigned friday, two days before he is supposed to appear before a committee. she was arrested on sunday and tuesday she is supposed to testify before this committee side by side with rupert murdoch and james. it's not clear whether she will be able to turn up or there will be restrictions based had on what she can say based on the arrest. that the latest. >> gregg: amy, thank you. >> heather: called the most mor interesting presidential candidates, herman cain a real leader with real solutions. he spoke out about his candidacy and his vision for the country. peter due si reports from washington. >> he is known by 45% of all republicans. coming in third with ballot support behind romney and palin. on the fox news sunday he
meantry session. >> yesterday, scotland yard's number two was forced to design this less than 20 hours after the commissioner himself stepped down. both claim their integrity is intact but staying on would be a distraction amidst intense media coverage of the role police media mail have played here and for hiring a news of the world editor now under arrest at a pr consultant. rebecca brooks who resigned as head of rupert murdoch's newspaper on sunday after she voluntarily went in for questioning. >> the position of rebecca brooks can be simply stated she is not guilty of any criminal offence. the position of the metropolitan police is less easy to understand. >>> government remains politically tainted as well the prime minister david cameron on official business in africa again under pressure to explain why he hired former news of the world editor andy cole son as chief of communications he stepped down in january and arrested last week. >> no one has argued that the work he did in government in any way was inappropriate or bad. he worked well in government, he then left government. >>
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)